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*nix for developers

Unix and Linux in their various forms are everywhere. Werther you are working on some server-side application or mobile app at any stage it is very likely that it will use Unix at some point.
That is why at our company we decided to have a small introduction demo/discussion on some useful concepts and command line tools.
We also went through a high-level overview starting with initial with run level and job control.
While most of the demoing is not visible via the slides I decided to share the slides anyway:


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