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JFokus 2016 : Java Awesomeness in the Heart of Scandinavia

Originally published on Voxxed https://www.voxxed.com/blog/2016/02/jfokus-2016-bringing-awesomeness-heart-scandinavia/
After watching many sessions online, this year I was able to attend Jfokus in person for the first time. This was the 10th edition of the event, bringing over 1800 attendees. One other thing to note is that the conference was sold out 2 weeks in advance, which as JFokus main organiser Mattias Karlsson commented, "hasn't happened in several years". This is testament that the Java community is still alive and kicking after all this time.
 

Amusement park fair party As a prequel to the main conference, there was a JFokus VM Tech Summit chaired by my Klarna colleague Markus Lagergren. Unfortunately, I didn't got visit this part of the event but Simon Ritter has a great write up on the Azul blog. The same day university sessions with 3 hour presentations on topics ranging from Mob Programming to TinkerForge and RXJava. The conference day started off with a great keynote by Brian Goetz on Java's evolution and future evolution.
There were many great talks throughout the day and you can see the speaker lineup as well as some of the presentation slides on the schedule page. I would really like to highlight a few which really got me thinking:
  • 'Git from the Bits Up' by Tim Berglund followed the creation of a git repository and how the information is internally represented by looking at the .git folder.
  • 'From Concurrent to Parallel' by Brian Goetz took me back to the college days of a parallel vs. serial code
  • Making Java more dynamic by Rafael Winterhalter covered the awesome topic of bytecode manipulation and how Byte Buddy can make things more simple.
Throughout the conference, Stephen Chin was live streaming and filming his NightHacking sessions. You can find the recordings on his blog but I would like to recommend the one from Simon Ritter on Struct-Like Performance in Java. The organisation was also excellent - internet at all times and no technical problems. I particularly enjoyed the amusement park-like theme of the party and the Atlassian and Red Hat bars. What followed the conference as a three day speakers (un)conference. Unfortunately this was not open for the general public, but two lucky people were selected to join the speakers in Vemdalen. Having taken part in unconferences before, I do understand the need to keep it small, but I would say that having few more outsiders is always good for the community. Here are few Tweets from behind the scenes:
Last but not least, here is a message from the JFokus team
And a few other images of the event up on the Flickr page,

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