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Google is removing search results?

Google has begun filtering results for searches that involve copyright  violation. In my opinion this is just a beginning of a series of events that are going to happen with the pretense of anti-piracy that will end up hurting freedom of speech  and eventuality things will become like 1984 if they haven't already...
Here is the image that I got searching for "gotye somebody that i used to know mp3"




Update:
As Michael McGraw-Herdeg pointed out in the comments, this has been here for long time. I don't remember seeing this in the past but apparently there is a law preventing Google and any other companies from displaying links like this...

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Chilling_Effects

http://www.nytimes.com/2002/04/22/business/new-economy-copyright-dispute-with-church-scientology-forcing-google-some.html?src=pm



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